Publications

Scholarly Journals--Published

  • Goldstein M. Better Regulation of Breast Milk Banking Will Protect Vulnerable Infants. Neonatology Today, Volume 17, Issue 4 Pages 72-74. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/20221747274. (04/2022) (link)
  • Mazela J, Blaz W, Galazkowski R, Czauderna P, Katarzyna-Kornacka M, Helwich E, Goldstein M. National System for Neonatal Transfer and Distribution of Ukrainian Children Requiring Hospitalization During the State of War in Ukraine Letters to the Editor. Volume 17, Issue 4 Pages 7-8. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/202217478. (04/2022) (link)
  • Merritt TA, Goldstein M. Appeal for Ukraine and the Ukrainian and Polish Doctors Caring for over Two Million Refugees. Neonatology Today, Volume 17, Issue 3 Pages 169-170. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/2022173169170. (03/2022) (link)
  • Hepworth S, Goldstein M. From Mom to Baby: Antibodies and Infant Health. Neonatology Today, Volume 17, Issue 3 Pages 155-156. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/2022173155156. (03/2022) (link)
  • Thornton P, Schifrin B, Goldstein M. Need for Glucose Screening after Fetal Distress, a Misadventure in the Normal Nursery: Letters to the Editor. Neonatology Today, Volume 17, Issue 2 Pages 190-191. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/2022172190191. (02/2022) (link)
  • Hepworth S, Goldstein M. Infant Health Matters: Knocking Down Pneumococcal Disease. Neonatology Today. Volume 17, Issue 2 Pages 144-145. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/2022172144145. (02/2022) (link)
  • Chou F, Goldstein M. Improving Reader Engagement by Embedding an Interactive Comment Widget in Digital Publications. Neonatology Today, Volume 17, Issue 2 Pages 71-74. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/20221727174 (02/2022) (link)
  • Hepworth S, Goldstein M. Infant Health Matters: Raising the Profile of Rare Diseases. Neonatology Today, Volume 17, Issue 1, Pages 139-140, DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/2022117139140 (01/2022) (link)
  • Manzar S, Pichilingue-Reto P, Goldstein M. Urgent Need of Antibiotic Stewardship in the NICU, Letters to the Editor. Neonatology Today, Volume 17, Issue 1 Pages 154-155. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/2022117154155. (01/2022) (link)
  • Improving COVID-19 Immunization Rates to Better Protect the Higher Vulnerability of Pregnant Women to Severe COVID Infection: Letter to the Editor. Neonatology Today. Volume 16, Issue 12, Pages 156-157. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/20211612156157 (12/2021) (link)
  • Lora F, Goldstein M. Why is the infant placed on a High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (HFOV) set primarily at a bias flow (BF) of 20 LPM? Letter to the Editor. Neonatology Today. Volume 16, Issue 11 Pages 167-169. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/202111161116716 (11/2021) (link)
  • White R, Browne J, Smith V, Goldstein M. Gravens Conference 2022: Transformational Change – Making it Happen in the NICU. Neonatology Today. Volume 16, Issue 10, Pages 39-40. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/20211016103940   (10/2021) (link)
  • Van Stralen D, Fayard E, Paz J, Shelby L, Goldstein M, Merritt TA. Disaster Series: Disaster Planning for Perinatal/Neonatal Medicine: Rethinking the Process and Caring for Mothers. Infants and Technology Dependent Infants - The Time is NOW. Neonatology Today. Volume 16, Issue 10, Pages 9-21. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/20210116109222 (10/2021) (link)
  • Hepworth S, Goldstein M. Infant Health Matters. Neonatology Today. Volume 16, Issue 9. Pages 138-139. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/20219169138139 (09/2021) (link)
  • Goldstein M. The Importance of Data in an Exclusive Human Milk Diet: Key Concepts and Points of Consideration. Neonatology Today. Volume 16, Issue 9, Pages 69-72. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/202191696972 (09/2021) (link)
  • King W, Goldstein M. Winning the Race to the Bottom -- How to Get a Meaningful Product to Market: Letter to the Editor. Neonatology Today. Volume 16, Issue 9, Pages 160-161. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/20219169160161 (09/2021) (link)
  • Levine G, Goldstein M. COVID 19 and RSV Are Both Surging: Letter to the Editor. Neonatology Today. Volume 16, Issue 8, Pages 150-151. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/20218168150151 (08/2021) (link)
  • Goldstein M. False Alarms Signal Urgency of Infant-Specific Devices. Neonatology Today. Volume 16, Issue 8 Pages 125-126. DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/20218168125126 (08/2021) (link)
  • Bowden A, Vasquez H, Goldstein M. False Positive Versus False Negative in Neonate Suspected Congenital Syphilis, Case Report with Analysis for Quality Improvement. Neonatology Today. Neonatology Today. Volume 16, Issue 8, Pages 3-7 DOI: https://doi.org/10.51362/neonatology.today/2021816837 (08/2021) (link)
  • Goldstein M, Krilov LR, Fergie J, Brannman L, Wade SW, Kong AM, et al. Unintended Consequences Following the 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics Policy Change for Palivizumab Prophylaxis among Infants Born at Less than 29 Weeks' Gestation. Am J Perinatol. 2021;38(S 01):e201-e6. Epub 2020/04/17. doi: 10.1055/s-0040-1709127. PubMed PMID: 32299107; PubMed Central PMCID: PMCPMC8397527 (08/2021) (link)
  • Hageman J, Goldstein M. Keeping Abreast of the Latest Terminology. (Letter to the Editor with a response by Goldstein M) Neonatology Today. 2021;16(7):147-148. doi:10.51362/neonatology.today/20217167147148 (07/2021)
  • Simmons, N, Goldstein M. Follow up to The Importance of Specialized Nursing Care for NICU Patients and Families. (Letter to the Editor with a response by Goldstein M) Neonatology Today. 2021;16(6):150-151. doi:10.51362/neonatology.today/20216166150151 (06/2021) (link)
  • Fergie J, Goldstein M, Krilov LR, Wade SW, Kong AM, Brannman L. Update on respiratory syncytial virus hospitalizations among U.S. preterm and term infants before and after the 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics policy on immunoprophylaxis: 2011-2017. Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2021;17(5):1536-45. Epub 2020/10/23. doi: 10.1080/21645515.2020.1822134. PubMed PMID: 33090914; PubMed Central PMCID: PMCPMC8078654. (04/2021) (link)
  • Domachowske JB, Anderson EJ, Goldstein M. The Future of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease Prevention and Treatment. Infect Dis Ther. 2021;10(Suppl 1):47-60. Epub 2021/03/04. doi: 10.1007/s40121-020-00383-6. PubMed PMID: 33656652; PubMed Central PMCID: PMCPMC7926075 (03/2021) (link)
  • Goldstein M, Fergie J, Krilov LR. Impact of the 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics Policy on RSV Hospitalization in Preterm Infants in the United States. Infect Dis Ther. 2021;10(Suppl 1):17-26. Epub 2021/03/04. doi: 10.1007/s40121-020-00388-1. PubMed PMID: 33656649; PubMed Central PMCID: PMCPMC8017053 (03/2021) (link)
  • Krilov LR, Forbes ML, Goldstein M, Wadhawan R, Stewart DL. Severity and Cost of RSV Hospitalization Among US Preterm Infants Following the 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics Policy Change. Infect Dis Ther. 2021;10(Suppl 1):27-34. Epub 2021/03/04. doi: 10.1007/s40121-020-00389-0. PubMed PMID: 33656650; PubMed Central PMCID: PMCPMC8017024 (03/2021) (link)
  • Hepworth S, Goldstein M. Poll: Parents Lack Awareness of Deadly RSV Virus. Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 12. pp 66-68. (12/2018) (link)
  • Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 12. Mitchell Goldstein, MD Editor-in-Chief Peer Reviewed Research, News and Information in Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine (12/2018) (link)
  • Ho T, Clark R, Goldstein M, Manifestations of a Terminal 5p Trisomy and a Terminal 6q DelectionCaused by an Unbalanced Chromosome Translocation in a Neonate. Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 11. pp 18-21. (11/2018) (link)
  • Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 11. Mitchell Goldstein, MD Editor-in-Chief Peer Reviewed Research, News and Information in Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine (11/2018) (link)
  • Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 10. Mitchell Goldstein, MD Editor-in-Chief Peer Reviewed Research, News and Information in Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine (10/2018) (link)
  • Goldstein M. Protecting Premature Infants from Infectious Disease. Neoantology Today. Volume 13. Issue 10. pp  53-55. (10/2018) (link)
  • Goldstein M. Still a Preemie? Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 9. pp 63-65 (09/2018) (link)
  • Goldstein M. Heart Rate: the Delivery Room Debate: Editor's Response. Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 9. pp 18-19. (09/2018) (link)
  • Merritt TA, Rogers S, O'Brien A, Pfister R, McEvoy C, Cohen H, Goldstein M.How Should States Approach Payment for PostDischarge Donor Human Milk for Low Birth Weight Infants when Mothers can no longer Breastfeed?  A Challenge for Medicaid Coverage. Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 9. pp 3-13. (09/2018) (link)
  • Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 9. Mitchell Goldstein, MD. Editor-in-Chief Peer Reviewed Research, News and Information in Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine (09/2018) (link)
  • Goldstein M. Understanding the Lack of Clinical Trials. Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 8. pp 45-48 (08/2018) (link)
  • Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 8. Mitchell Goldstein, MD. Editor-in-Chief Peer Reviewed Research, News and Information in Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine (08/2018) (link)
  • Goldstein M. Fish Consumption for Pregnant Women. Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 7. pp 49-52 (07/2018) (link)
  • Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 7. Mitchell Goldstein, MD. Editor-in-Chief Peer Reviewed Research, News and Information in Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine (07/2018) (link)
  • Goldstein M. The Value of human Milk Access for Premature Infants. Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 5. pp 51-53. (06/2018) (link)
  • Null D, Goldstein M, Pramanick A, and Derdack S. Abstracts from the Advances in Therapeutics and Technology Meeting on APril2-5, 2018 in Snowbird, Utah.  Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 5. pp 33-45. (06/2018) (link)
  • Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 6. Mitchell Goldstein, MD. Editor-in-Chief Peer Reviewed Research, News and Information in Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine (06/2018) (link)
  • Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 5. Mitchell Goldstein, MD Editor-in-Chief Peer Reviewed Research, News and Information in Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine (05/2018) (link)
  • Goldstein M. Diversity and Disparity: Breaking Down Access Barriers. Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 5. pp 45-49, May 2018. (05/2018)
  • Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 4. Mitchell Goldstein, MD Editor-in-Chief Peer Reviewed Research, News and Information in Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine (04/2018) (link)
  • Goldstein M. New Tubing Connectors Create Unforeseen Challenges for Neonates. Neonatology Today. Volume 13 / Issue 4/ 24-25 April 2018. (04/2018)
  • Robert K, Merritt TA, Goldstein M. What is the “Best” Way to Administer Surfactant in 2018? The Case for the Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA). Neonatology Today. Volume 13 / Issue 4 April 2018. (04/2018)
  • Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 3. Mitchell Goldstein, editor in chief Peer Reviewed Research, News and Information in Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine (03/2018) (link)
  • Goldstein M. The National Coalition for Infant Health (NCfIH) - Establishing Exclusively Human Milk for Very Low Birthweight Babies as Our Nation’s Standard of Care. Volume 13 / Issue 3 March 2018. (03/2018)
  • Goldstein M. Loma Linda Publishing Company Acquires Neonatology Today. Neonatology Today. Volume 13 / Issue 2 February 2018. (02/2018)
  • Kong A, Krilov L, Fergie J, Goldstein M, Diakun D, Wade S, Pavilack M, McLaurin K. The 2014–2015 National Impact of the 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics Guidance for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Immunoprophylaxis on Preterm Infants Born in the United States. Amer J Perinatol 2018; 35(02): 192-200. DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1606352. (02/2018)
  • Goldstein M; Phillips R; DeVincenzo JP;  Krilov LR; Merritt TA; Yogev R; Staebler S; Kadri M; Fergie JE; Schechter MS; Gorham M; Cherry JD. National Perinatal Association 2018 Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Prevention Clinical Practice Guideline: An Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Collaboration. Neonatology Today. Volume 12 / Issue 10:1-14. October 2017. (10/2017) (link)
  • Impact of 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics Guidance for RSV Immunoprophylaxis. Kong AM, Krilov L, Fergie J, Goldstein M, Diakun D, Wade S, Pavilack M, McLaurin KK. American Journal of Perinatology. Am J Perinatol 2017 Sep 7. Epub 2017 Sep 7. (09/2017)
  • Haug S, Goldstein M, Cummins D, Fayard E, & Merritt T A. (2017). Using Patient-Centered Care After a Prenatal Diagnosis of Trisomy 18 or Trisomy 13: A Review. JAMA Pediatr, 171(4), 382-387. Importance: Patient-centered care (PCC) has been advocated by the Institute of Medicine to improve health care in the United States. Four concepts of PCC align with clinical ethics principles and are associated with enhanced patient/parent satisfaction. These concepts are dignity and respect, information sharing, participation, and collaboration. The objective of this article is to use the PCC approach as a framework for an extensive literature review evaluating the current status of counseling regarding prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 18 (T18) or trisomy 13 (T13) and to advocate PCC in the care of these infants. Observations: Extensive availability of prenatal screening and diagnostic testing has led to increased detection of chromosomal anomalies early in pregnancy. After diagnosis of T18 or T13, counseling and care have traditionally been based on assumptions that these aneuploidies are lethal or associated with poor quality of life, a view that is now being challenged. Recent evidence suggests that there is variability in outcomes that may be improved by postnatal interventions, and that quality-of-life assumptions are subjective. Parental advocacy for their infant's best interest mimics this variability as requests for resuscitation, neonatal intensive care, and surgical intervention are becoming more frequent. Conclusions and Relevance: With new knowledge and increased parental advocacy, physicians face ethical decisions in formulating recommendations including interruption vs continuation of pregnancy, interventions to prolong life, and choices to offer medical or surgical procedures. We advocate a PCC approach, which has the potential to reduce harm when inadequate care and counseling strategies create conflicting values and uncertain outcomes between parents and caregivers in the treatment of infants with T18 and T13. (04/2017) (link)
  • Goldstein M, Tong C, Allen TM, Fayard E, Terry M, et al. Use of a Nebulizer to Deliver High Frequency High Flow with a Nasal Cannula. Acad J Ped Neonatol. 2017; 3(4): 555619  DOI:10.19080/AJPN.2017.03.555619003 (03/2017)
  • Milligan P S, & Goldstein M R. (2017). Implementation of an evidence-based non-invasive respiratory support (NIRS) bundle in the NICU to decrease nasal injury complications. Journal of Neonatal Nursing, 23(2), 89-98. Background Nasal skin breakdown is a common complication of non-invasive respiratory support (NIRS) therapy. The objective of this quality improvement project was to improve assessments and standardize care to infants receiving NIRS to reduce iatrogenic nasal injury complications. Methods Nursing staff NIRS knowledge and action were assessed using a self-report survey created for the project. A NIRS bundle was implemented to standardized care provided to all infants receiving NIRS. Infant chart reviews were conducted to determine incidence and severity of nasal injury before and after NIRS bundle implementation. Results Twenty-six nurses completed pre and post survey assessments. Combined NIRS care scores improved from an average of 16.81 (SD = 1.569) to 17.57 (SD = 1.287, p = 0.058). NIRS knowledge scores slightly improved from an average of 6.76 (SD = 2.016) to 6.88 (SD = 1.495, p = 0.833). The incidence of nasal injuries from NIRS use was reduced by 15.8% (34.7% compared to 18.9%; p = 0.086). Conclusion Improving staff NIRS knowledge and standardizing NIRS care is associated with decreased incidence of nasal injury. Implementing feasible evidence-based interventions impact neonatal care by decreasing unintended treatment complications and increasing NIRS success. (01/2017) (link)
  • Goldstein M R, Patel M, Harding B, Merritt T A, Tong C, Fayard E, & Peverini R. (2016). Phasic Alteration In High Frequency Flow Acceleration By Removal Of The Active Exhalation Phase. Am J Respir Crit Care Med, 193, . (2016)
  • Goldstein Mitchell, Yang Linda, Martin Gilbert, Shah Mita, Bloom Sue, . . . Furman Gilbert. (2015). Use of the Serum Bacterial Antigen Test for the Detection of Group B Streptococcal Neonatal Sepsis. Newborn & Infant Nursing Reviews, 15(1), 28-32. The Revised Guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control for the Prevention of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease were presented in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. An algorithm for evaluation of Group B Streptococcal sepsis (GBS) included CBC and differential, blood culture, possible chest x-ray, and lumbar puncture when signs of sepsis were present. The serum bacterial antigen was not mentioned in the recommendations although its clinical use for GBS evaluation has continued. We sought to determine if routine use of Group B Streptococcal Serum Antigen screening was indicated. According to hospital practice, serum bacterial antigens were drawn along with blood cultures in evaluation of sepsis for patients up to 2 months of age. Use of serum bacterial antigen testing using the BD Directigen Combo test was analyzed retrospectively over a five year period. Predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity of the analysis were studied relative to presence of a positive blood culture result. Over a five year period (2001â??2005), 3336 serum bacterial antigens were performed. During that time, there were 23 positives (0.69%) for GBS. There were 3313 negatives (99%). There were 11 cases where the bacterial antigen predicted the Group B neonatal sepsis. There were 12 cases where the bacterial antigen test was positive for GBS; however, the blood cultures had no growth. In two cases, the antigen test was positive for GBS with a positive blood culture for a different bacterium: one blood culture grew Bacillus species; and the other, coagulase negative Staphylococcus . During 2005, the NICU had no positive blood cultures for GBS, and there were only two other cases hospital-wide where the bacterial antigen test predicted a positive blood culture for GBS. Although sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value were 99%â??100%, the positive predictive value was 48% with a disease prevalence of 0.33%. Continued evaluation of Group B Streptococcal Antigen would not result in an identifiable risk reduction and is not justifiable for routine screening. (2015) (link)
  • Febre Aprille, Merritt T Allen, Terry Michael, Tong Carter, & Goldstein Mitchell. (2015). Adaptive Dynamic Inspiratory Nasal Apparatus: Comparison to Traditional Nasal Continuous Airway Pressure (NCPAP). Newborn & Infant Nursing Reviews, 15(1), 17-20. Background: The use of high flow nasal cannula has increased dramatically in the neonatal intensive care setting. High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) simulates a continuous positive airway pressure despite unpredictable leak by way of using a higher flow to â??overwhelmâ?? the resistive capacity of the nares and create a NCPAP like effect. There is no absolute way to assure that the transmitted pressures do not exceed what might be considered a safe range for the neonate. The ADINA (Adaptive Dynamic Inspiratory Nasal Apparatus) introduces an additional safety mechanism designed to adaptively restrict the amount of pressure that can be delivered to the nasal interface. Although flows can be entrained up to 4 LPM, airway pressure is limited by an adaptive pop off valve set at 10 cm H 2 O. Even if the pop off mechanisms were to fail to actuate, the device would continue to provide high flow nasal cannula delivery at levels that are already in wide clinical use. Methods: Patients were randomized to receive either â??standardâ?? nasal CPAP with Hudson prongs or high flow nasal cannula with the ADINA. Hudson prongs NCPAP pressure was started at 4â??8 cm H 2 O. High flow nasal cannula was started at 2â??4 L/min of flow. Oxygen requirement, level of pressure or flow support, radiologic changes, blood gas measurement, time to wean off protocol, and failure to wean/necessity for endotracheal intubation were monitored. 19 subjects were enrolled. Objectives: 1. Real-time device actuationâ??Can high flow nasal cannula be delivered with the additional safety of a pop off that actuates in real time? 2. Comfort of interfaceâ??Can this novel device provide a high flow nasal cannula effect simulating CPAP at the same comfort levels as those provided by conventional nasal cannula? Results: See Table below. There were two parents who refused to consent out of concern that their child would randomize to CPAP. Discussion: Although there was significant difference apparent in days on ADINA versus NCPAP ( p < 0.01) (9.8 ± 8.6 vs. 1.4 ± 0.7), a significant bias towards the ADINA cannula was evident (both towards selection and continuation). No patient failed within a week of starting ADINA, although several patients failed to tolerate NCPAP. Patients randomized to ADINA trended towards lower birthweight and post-conceptual age at the time of the study. No complications of air leak, hypotension, or barotrauma were evident in either group. Conclusion: ADINA appears to be at equivalent to NCPAP in providing non-invasive ventilation. (2015) (link)
  • Merritt T A, Goldstein M, Philips R, Peverini R, Iwakoshi J, Rodriguez A, & Oshiro B. (2014). Impact of ART on pregnancies in California: an analysis of maternity outcomes and insights into the added burden of neonatal intensive care. Journal of Perinatology, 34(5), 345-350. Objective:We reviewed the occurrence of prematurity, low birth weight, multiple gestations, frequency of stillbirths and maternity care-associated variables including hospital stay and hospital charges of women conceiving using assisted reproductive technology (ART) or artificial insemination (AI) compared with women with a history of infertility who conceived naturally, and all other naturally conceived pregnancies in California at non-federal hospitals between 2009 and 2011. At a single center, infants born after ART/AI were compared with infants provided care in the normal nursery.Study design:Publically available inpatient data sets from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development for years 2009-2011 using data from all California non-federal hospitals were used to determine the impact of ART on a variety of pregnancy-related outcomes and infant characteristics. Infant data from a single center was used to determine hospital charges for infants delivered over an 18-month period to compare the hospital and physician charges indexed to similar charges for infants admitted to the 'normal' newborn nursery.Result:Among ART/AI pregnancies, there was a 4-5-fold increase in stillbirths, compared with a 2-3-fold increase among women with infertility compared with other naturally conceiving women. ART/AI pregnancies underwent more cesarean sections (fourfold), and a near fourfold increase in the rate of preterm deliveries. Multiple gestations were increased 24-27-fold compared with naturally conceived pregnancies. Maternal hospital stay and hospital charges were increased among those undergoing ART/AI. Infant charges were increased multi-fold for singletons, twins and triplets delivered after ART/AI compared with naturally conceived infants.Conclusion:Multiple births, preterm births and a higher overall rate of fetal anomalies were found in California after ART/AI for 2009-2011. Cesarean section rates, longer length of maternal stay and hospital charges among women receiving ART/AI could be lowered if emphasis on elective single embryo transfers was a higher priority among providers. Charges for the care of infants delivered after ART/AI are substantially higher than among naturally conceived infants born late preterm or at term. Families seeking ART/AI need to be informed of the impact of these adverse pregnancy outcomes, including neonatal outcomes and charges for medical care for their infant(s), when considering ART/AI. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Perinatology is the property of Nature Publishing Group and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.) (2014) (link)
  • Phillips R M, Goldstein M, Hougland K, Nandyal R, Pizzica A, . . . Natl Perinatal Assoc. (2013). Multidisciplinary guidelines for the care of late preterm infants. Journal of Perinatology, 33, S5-S22. (07/2013) (link)
  • Prevention of Postpartum Smoking Relapse in Mothers of Infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Phillips R, Merritt T, Goldstein M, Deming D, Slater L, Angeles, D J Perinatology 2011 August (Epub ahead of print) (08/2011)

Abstract

  • Goldstein M. Fish Consumption for Pregnant Women. Neonatology Today. Volume 13. Issue 7. pp 51-53 (07/2018) (link)
  • Goldstein M. Loma Linda Publishing Company Acquires Neonatology Today. Neonatology Today. Volume 13 / Issue 2 February 2018. (02/2018)

Scholarly Journals--Accepted

  • Goldstein M, Tong C, Allen TM, Fayard E, Terry M, et al. Use of a Nebulizer to Deliver High Frequency High Flow with a Nasal Cannula. Acad J Ped Neonatol. 2017; 3(4): 555619  DOI:10.19080/AJPN.2017.03.555619003 (03/2017)