the Micah 6:8 series logo

A part of the "NeighborGood" initiative, the Micah 6:8 series was developed to create space for meaningful conversations and training around diversity, equity, and inclusion to facilitate culturally appropriate health care education and practice at Loma Linda University Health.

Join us for our upcoming presentations, featuring discussions and experiences geared to facilitate health and wellness here at LLUH.

Please note: You will be able to ask questions anonymously once joining the chat above. Although it requests your name, you may choose to submit questions not associated with your name.

Season Two - Videos and Presenters

June: Facing Our History, Ourselves and Our Future

May: Asian American, Native Hawaiian & Pacific Islander Identities

April: The Conflation of Identity, Religion & Culture

March: Sexism, Racism & Economic Inequity

February: Increasing Empathy & Healing

Dr. Sandra Banjoko is a licensed marriage and family therapist working with different populations including crisis, trauma, grief and loss, human sexuality, eating disorders and culture. An alumnus of Loma Linda University Dr. Banjoko earned a Master of Public Health in Nutrition (‘15) and a Ph.D. (‘21) in Couples, Families and Systems.  A registered dietician, Dr. Banjoko has experience in health clinics, agencies and hospitals both nationally and internationally. Her journey began with her training in culinary arts and nutrition which earned her a BS (‘12) from Johnson & Wales University, Rhode Island. Dr. Banjoko’s commitment to support the healing and growth of her clients is central to her practice.  

Glenn C.W. Scott Jr., LCSW  has worked with children adolescents and families struggling with behavioral health issues for the past 20 years. He is the Director of the Youth Partial Hospital Program Redlands Campus and Murrieta Campus at Loma Linda University Behavioral Medicine Center. The Youth Partial Hospital Program works with children and adolescents along with their families who have attempted suicide or at risk of dying by suicide.  

As part of leading the Youth Partial Hospital Program, Glenn has worked hard to expand hospital based behavioral health services for children, adolescents and families, reduce stigma and encourage young people that life is worth living and suicide is not the answer. He is from the island of Bermuda and loves football (die hard New England Patriots fan), going to the beach and working the BBQ grill whenever he can.  

Dr. Rhondda Robinson Thomas is the Calhoun Lemon Professor of Literature at Clemson University where she has been teaching, researching, and writing about early African American literature in the Department of English since 2007.  She has published Call My Name, Clemson: Documenting the Black Experience in an American University Community and essays and other books about slave narratives, Black auto/biography, Black authors and the Bible, and Black American citizenship. Dr. Thomas is the faculty director of the award-winning Call My Name Project that documents the history of African Americans at Clemson University from enslavement in the antebellum period to activism in the 21st century for which she has been awarded a Whiting Foundation Fellowship; grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, South Carolina Humanities, and Clemson University’s Office of the Provost; and gifts from the Clemson University Foundation, Division of Inclusion and Equity, and College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities. She is Clemson University’s 2021 Researcher of the Year, and Clemson faculty recently selected her as the Class of ’39 Award recipient for 2021. Currently, Dr. Thomas is the Research and Community Engagement Coordinator for Clemson’s African American Burial Ground and Woodland Cemetery Historic Preservation Project. She is a sixth-generation South Carolinian, loves cooking vegan food, hiking, and traveling, and is part of the Maranatha Farms and Wellness team in Greenville, SC, that has created the largest Black-owned urban garden in Upstate South Carolina specifically to serve local residents in food deserts.

January: Dispelling the Myth of Colorblindness

Recourse PDF

Timothy Golden, Ph.D. has earned a PhD in philosophy and has more than twenty years of experience as a lawyer. His areas of scholarly research include African American philosophy and critical race theory. Golden is currently editing a book titled Racism and Resistance: Essays on Derrick Bell’s Racial Realism. He has also published philosophical essays and teaches African American philosophy and critical race theory at Walla Walla University. 

Amy Hayton, MD, MPH is the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and Wellness for the School of Medicine. She graduated from LLU SOM and SPH in 2004 and completed her Internal Medicine training at LLU. She practices clinically at the VA in primary care where she enjoys mentoring medical students in the practice of whole person care. She is married to Andy Hayton, a psychiatrist and they have three children. Amy is passionate about medical student education and helping students remain in their purpose to make a difference both with their individual patients and the communities they are a part of. 

Yi-Shen Ma, Ph.D. is an assistant professor of ethics at Loma Linda University (LLU) and co-director of the Center for Christian Bioethics. He received his B.A. from La Sierra University. He earned his M.A. and Ph.D. from Claremont School of Theology. Beyond his current roles at LLU, he has served in the United States Navy and pastored two local congregations. Dr. Ma’s research lies at the intersection of Christian theology, social justice, and bioethics.

December: A Lesson on Inclusiveness

Panicha “PK” Kittipha,  MSN, APRN, PHN, AGACNP-BC, CCRN, best known as PK throughout Loma Linda, has been at LLUH for over 12 years. PK’s preferred pronouns are he/him/his. He identifies within the LGBTQ+ community and has remained active since his undergraduate studies at CSUF. PK started working at LLUH as a bedside nurse in the Medical ICU after graduating from LLUSN in 2010. He has a Bachelor of Science in Cellular and Molecular Biology (CSUF, 2005) and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (LLU, 2010). PK completed his Master of Science in Nursing as an Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner from UCLA in 2016. His experience ranges from Critical Care, Pulmonology, Informatics, Neuro Critical Care, General/GI Surgery, and Bariatric Surgery. He is currently working on his Doctor of Nursing Practice at Yale. He has a passion for education, has taught as a faculty member at the School of Nursing at Loma Linda, and continues to guest lecture each quarter. PK is passionate about social justice, diversity, equity, and inclusion and strives to bridge healthcare equity for all people through empowerment, encouragement, and enlightenment on transgender health and awareness. 

Roman McInnerney, MD, is a 3rd-year pediatrics resident at LLLUCH. Dr. McInnerney was a non-traditional medical student upon entering medical school. He is an Army veteran married with four wonderful children. Traveling, learning about other people, cultures, and faiths are a few of the experiences that he enjoys. Since starting medical school, advocating for the underserved has been an ongoing passion, especially LGBTQIA+ issues in healthcare. He is currently a resident leader for PRIDE, the LGBTQIA+ resident organization here at Loma Linda. 

Nicholas Topoleski, RN, BSN, is an Adult Health III Instructor at Loma Linda University School of Nursing (LLUSN) and a Critical Care Registered Nurse at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). He is currently completing a Master’s of Science in Nursing Education at Western Governors and a Doctor of Nursing Practice: Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist at Loma Linda University. Nicholas’ research interests include transgender health, vulnerable populations, and quality improvement in nursing care practice. He is a recipient of the DAISY Faculty Award in 2021.  He is a Co-Sponsor for SAGA and an advocate for the LGBTQIA+ community. 

November: How does“Othering”Affect Healthcare Education?

Dr. Bridgette Peteet, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Loma Linda University. Before her appointment last year, she was a faculty member at the University of Cincinnati for 11 years. She is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist who currently supervises doctoral trainees at SAC Health System in San Bernardino. Dr. Peteet teaches courses on addiction and cultural diversity.   She also runs the Resilience and Disparities (RAD) Lab, which investigates health inequities in substance use disorders/opioid use disorders (SUD/OUD) using a community-inclusive and culturally-responsive framework. She is the Principal Investigator (PI) on a $3 million HRSA Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students grant to build pathways to diversify the scientific workforce. She has facilitated cultural competency training for universities, businesses, and community health agencies for more than 15 years. Dr. Peteet is a past recipient of the UC Mariam Spencer Diversity Ambassador Award and the Charles and Shirley Thomas Award from the American Psychological Association Division 45, Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and Race for her institutional and national contributions to diversity, equity, and inclusion.    

Patricia M. Flynn, Ph.D., M.P.H., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and the Department of Preventive Medicine at Loma Linda University. She is a health psychologist with expertise on the role of culture in health behavior and outcome. Dr. Flynn teaches graduate-level psychology courses on Health Psychology, Health Disparities and Inequalities, Cultural Psychology, and Cultural Research Methods. She is co-director of the Culture and Behavior Laboratory which investigates the role of culture in health behavior (e.g., cancer screening, continuity of care, diabetes treatment adherence) and doctor-patient relations (e.g., implicit bias, intercultural communication). In her role as the Director of Cultural Sensitivity Training for a HRSA Teaching Health Center grant at the SAC Health System, she trains medical residents to provide culturally sensitive care. Dr. Flynn also helps facilitate Health Disparities research for medical residents across campus. In collaboration with Dr. Bridgette Peteet, she is co-Principal Investigator on a 2.95 million dollar HRSA grant dedicated to providing scholarships and mentorship opportunities for economically and educationally disadvantaged students interested in pursuing a career in primary care psychology.   

Nicholas Topoleski, RN, BSN, is an Adult Health III Instructor at Loma Linda University School of Nursing (LLUSN), a Critical Care Registered Nurse, and an Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). He is currently completing a Master of Science in Nursing Education at Western Governors and a Doctor of Nursing Practice.  His research interests include transgender health, vulnerable populations, and quality improvement in nursing care practice. Mr. Topoleski is a Co-Sponsor for SAGA, an advocate for the LGBTQIA+ community, and a recipient of the DAISY Faculty Award in 2021. 

October: ¿Habla Español?: Lesson from the LatinX Paradox

Juan Carlos Belliard, Ph.D., MPH

Assistant Vice President for Community Partnerships Director Institute for Community Partnerships Professor in Global Health LOMA LINDA UNIVERSITY HEALTH

Juan Carlos Belliard has taught in culture and health; traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine; ethnographic research methods; health disparities; and migrant health. His research interests are focused on medical pluralism, exploring how migrant communities utilize parallel systems of health care. Dr. Belliard is dedicated to various efforts that strengthen community-university relationships. His passion for minority health, education, and health equity have been an impetus in creating the Promotores Academy at the San Manuel Gateway College, a certificate program for promotores/community health workers trained to bridge the gap between health systems and the community. Dr. Belliard and his wife Anastasia have two children Victoria and Nicolás. The Belliards all share a love for music, reading, traveling, camping, running, and futbol.

Valeria Bordes MS, AMFT

Valeria Bordes is a first-generation Mexican American, Doctoral Student, and Bilingual Clinical Therapist with Loma Linda BMC Youth Partial Program. Valeria has worked with children and families and has primarily serviced marginalized populations in underserved communities. Valeria has a passion for serving her community through advocacy, stigma reduction, and resource connection. In her capacity as a Clinician, Valeria helps families build resiliency and increase community engagement for self-efficacy empowerment and overall family wellness.

Daisy De Leon, PhD

Dr. De Leon is the Director of the Research Core for the EXPORT program at the Center for Health Disparities. As assistant to the Dean for Diversity she also coordinates research and educational programs for underrepresented minority students from junior high school, high school, and undergraduate students from local schools interested in a career in medicine and biomedical research.

Season One - Videos and Presenters

June: Why are Black Mothers & Babies in Crisis?

Shareela Allen, LCSW is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over 11 years of clinical experience in both the private and public sectors. Shareela is trained and certified in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, Anger Management, and Grief and Loss for Children, Adolescents and Adults. She enjoys working with various populations however, children and teens are her favorite modalities. Shareela’s approach is relatable, strengths-based and collaborative. She is aware of the social, economic and cultural influences that may affect clients as they are seeking therapy. Shareela works with clients with a variety of mental health concerns including, depression, anxiety, bi-polar, grief, narcissism, at risk children and families, perfectionists, PTSD, life transitions and family changes. Topics of exploration are not limited and include career challenges, parenting strategies, stress management techniques and grief and loss surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic.

Shareela believes that through a direct, collaborative, non-judgmental approach, her clients can explore specific barriers that prevent progress, determine the direction for restoration, and the promote self-advocacy to process their concerns in a safe environment. In 2020, Shareela cofounded her private practice; Change Therapeutic Services, Inc., where she maintains a relationship of respect for the therapeutic relationship while supporting clients to explore areas that caused distress while developing goals as they move towards a progressive future. Everyone that knows Shareela will tell you that she is fun, loving, loyal, organized, hardworking and creative.

Deidre Coutsompos, CD, ICCE, CLEC is a compassionate and caring advocate for Black birth. In an effort to address the staggering infant and maternal mortality rates in the African-American community, 12 years into her practice, Deidre’s passion and drive expanded from supporting birthing families to mentoring and training novice doulas and seasoned birth workers, alike. Deidre is a founding member of the Sankofa Birthworkers’ Collective of the Inland Empire, a collective of Black birthworkers, reclaiming their rights to birth through connection, cause and community.

Deidre is currently the lead of Maternal Wellness department and coordinator for Doula Access Program. A program that provides free birth Doula services to families that have public health insurance all over the Inland Empire. In addition, they will be hosting a Black Maternal Health Series: Overdue Conversations: Understanding the past, acknowledging the present, preparing for the future. This will be a time for medical providers to explore systemic racism, while learning about tools they can apply to their practice and care to improve outcomes for Black birthing families.

Lisa R. Roberts, Dr.PH, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CHES, FAANP, FAAN is a Professor and the Research Director at Loma Linda University School of Nursing, with a secondary appointment as Professor in the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies in the School of Behavioral Health to facilitate collaborative translational research. Her MSN and Family Nurse Practitioner training was obtained at Western University of Health Sciences, and her Dr.PH in health education at the LLU School of Public Health.
Dr. Roberts' background as a clinician and international experience are foundational to her research. While she has conducted projects in several other countries, having been raised in India, she has ongoing research in India pertaining to maternal mental health. Across setting, including in the US, her research is translational, interdisciplinary, and community-based, addressing health disparities and vulnerable populations. Her clinical focus is prevention and primary care. She enjoys teaching and mentoring as this provides the opportunity to influence the next generation of nursing researchers and scholars to care for the vulnerable and reduce health disparities.

Amber Warmsley, MD is a wife of six years to an amazing husband and a mother of two young children. She’s a native Southern Californian transplanted to the D.C. metro area who will always love the beach. She pursued her medical education at University of New York at Buffalo and completed her Ob/Gyn residency at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, NY and has a total of 12 yeas of experience. Dr. Warmsley is currently the department Chairperson and practicing physician at White Oak Medical Center in Silver Spring, MD.

In addition to international service and working with underserved communities, Dr. Warmsley is passionate about fostering a collaborative care approach to pregnancy related care and creating a safe, positive, and uplifting birthing experience. She believes that all women and families deserve compassion, respect, dignity, and shared decision-making from their birthing team.

May: Making Sense of the Senseless Anti-Asian Violence

Ruth Chung, Ph.D., is a professor of counseling psychology at University of Southern California where she teaches and directs the Marriage and Family Therapy program. Her areas of research and clinical expertise are in Asian American immigrant families and bicultural identity development of immigrant youth. She is a recipient of a Fulbright Award to Korea and has conducted research on the Korean American community for the Korean government. Dr. Chung is a graduate of PUC and is currently on the Board of Trustees at PUC.

Ann K. Jay, MD is a wife and mother of two daughters and human-esque dog aptly named Steve. Dr. Jay is a neuroradiologist at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital and serves as the Director of Head and Neck Imaging. Dr. Jay is the Vice Chair of Education for her department as well as the Program Director for the Diagnostic Radiology Residency. For Georgetown University School of Medicine, she is the co-director for the Diagnostic Reasoning and Testing course, co-director for the new longitudinal Diversity, Equity and Inclusion track, and faculty advisor for the Asian Pacific American Medical Student Association. Dr. Jay is passionate about medical education, mentorship, and DEI issues.

David K. Yoo, Ph.D., is Vice Provost and Professor of Asian American Studies and History at UCLA. Professor Yoo focuses on Asian American history and is the author of Contentious Spirits: Religion in Korean American History, 1903-1945 and the lead editor for the Oxford Handbook of Asian American History. He has been a Senior Fulbright Scholar (Korea) and received fellowships from the American Council on Education, the Haynes Foundation, and the Huntington Library.

April: Isn’t Minority Representation “Reverse Racism”?

Martha Duah, LLUSM Class of 2021

Martha Duah was born in Ghana and raised in Berrien Springs, MI. She attended Andrews University, and where her passion for social justice grew. She is currently a 4th-year medical student at LLU and recently matched to the Boston Medical Center psychiatry program. She hopes to eventually do a fellowship in Child & Adolescent and Forensic Psychiatry. She is also very interested in global mental health. 

Pedro A. Orta, MD, MPH
Resident Physician (PGY-2)
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles

Dr. Pedro Orta is a physician at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, where he is completing his pediatric residency. He loves using his medical skills and passion for mental health to empower youth in the LGBTQ and Latinx communities of which he is a part. Pedro completed his health policy studies at the Harvard School of Public Health and medicine at Loma Linda University School of Medicine. Pedro usually works out with his CrossFit family in his spare time, exploring LA’s culinary scene or developing his mindfulness practice. He looks forward to a long career dedicated to uplifting the voice of the unheard and bringing physical and mental healing to youth at the margins.

Ogechi Nwaokelemeh, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Kinesiology
Westmont College

Dr. Ogechi Nwaokelemeh is an Assistant Professor of Kinesiology at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, CA. She is a Public Health Kinesiologist whose research interests include pediatric obesity prevention initiatives in underserved communities and physical activity promotion in school and workplace settings. She considers ‘exercise’ to be her’ drug of choice’ to promote wellness and prevent disease.  She looks forward to continuing to explore dynamic ways to use the ‘art and science’ of movement as a source of health promotion in both academic settings and the community at large.

March: Can I be a person of Faith and a Racist?

Download the March handout

Maury Jackson, DMin, an ordained minister in the Adventist Christian communion, served as pastor for congregations on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. He researches, writes, and teaches in the area of practical theology. He studies the practical arts of preaching and the church’s pastoral vocation to the larger community, i.e., reconciliation of communities that struggle with racism, sexism, classism…etc. The tools of theological reflection, moral evaluation, and cultural investigation inform his study of ministry practice.

Claudia Allen, MA is a writer and international speaker passionate about the intersection of faith, culture, and justice.

After earning her Bachelors in English and her minor in Leadership in 2013, Claudia went on to Georgetown University where she subsequently graduated with her Masters in English in 2015. After 4.5 years of study, teaching, and assistance with curriculum development concerning literature, writing, and social change at the University of Maryland, College Park, Claudia left her PhD in English to pursue full-time employment in publishing, justice, and local church ministry. In alignment with these goals, Claudia completed a certificate in Theology and Racialized Policing from Sojourners, Howard University School of Divinity, and the Christian Community Development Association in June of 2020.

Passionate about the work of justice, Claudia believes she made her first mark during her senior year at Andrews University. In fulfillment of the "Change Project" requirements for the Undergraduate Leadership Program, Claudia created and successfully implemented an African American Studies Minor housed out of the Andrews University Department of History. This project made Claudia the first student to graduate from Andrews University with a minor in Leadership, and the first undergraduate student to successfully amend curriculum at the institution.

Currently, Claudia is the Online Content Manager for Message magazine. With her co-hosted podcast “What’s the Message?” Claudia has interviewed individuals like Shaun King, Rev. Dr. Gayle Fisher-Stewart, Jim Wallis, Rev. William Lamar IV, Dr. Carlton P. Byrd, Dr. Lisa Bowens, and several other distinguished guests.

As a writer, Claudia has published articles on faith, culture, and justice in religious and non-religious magazines and journals. She is a contributing author to Rev. Dr. Gayle Fisher-Stewart's latest book, Preaching Black Lives (Matter) and Dr. Maury Jackson and Nathan Brown’s forth-coming book A House on Fire: Why Anti-Racism is an Adventist Imperative.

Claudia is a highly sought-after international public speaker. She has spoken for several universities, churches, and organizations. Last year, her virtual speaking took her to such countries as South Africa, Ireland, Australia, and across the United States. For her commitment to justice, community engagement, and the work of writing and speaking, Claudia was given the first Drum Major for Justice Award from Washington Adventist University on January 18, 2021.

Whether through speaking or writing, Claudia is dedicated to activating people to “do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with God.” Her favorite scripture is Philippians 2:13, “For it is God is working in you both to will and to do His good pleasure.”

February: A Lesson on Why Black History is American History

Download the February handout

Maury Jackson, DMin. is an Associate Professor of Practical Theology at La Sierra University. An ordained minister in the Adventist Christian communion, Dr. Jackson served as pastor for congregations on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. He researches, writes and teaches in the area of practical theology. He studies the practical arts of preaching and the church’s pastoral vocation to the larger community, i.e., reconciliation of communities that struggle with racism, sexism, classism…etc. The tools of theological reflection, moral evaluation, and cultural investigation inform his study of ministry practice.

Lisa Clark Diller, Ph.D. is a historian (University of Chicago) who teaches about the early modern world at Southern Adventist University.  Dr. Clark Diller serves as the History and Political Studies chair at Southern Adventist University, Chattanooga, TN. She researches and writes on religious and ethnic minorities and the development of modern liberal democracy. In addition to seventeenth-century religion and politics, Dr. Clark Diller enjoys neighborhood service and activism with her husband, Tommy Diller. She enjoys being part of three book clubs, one cycling club, and playing with her ten nieces and nephews in her free time.  She and her husband live in an urban community in Chattanooga, TN, where they garden, church plant, and thrive in their neighbors' care.

January: What is Health Equity?

(Download the January Handout)

Ramona Snipes, MD, is the assistant executive medical director of Permanente Human Resources and Physician Culture for the Southern California Permanente Medical Group (SCPMG). SCPMG is one of the largest self-governing medical groups in the country, consisting of more than 7,800 physicians caring for nearly 4.7 million Kaiser Permanente members in 234 medical office buildings and 15 hospitals across Southern California. In this role, Dr. Snipes works with Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity; Physician Wellness; and Physician and Physician Leader Development teams providing oversight to ensure the execution of strategic programs in the key areas of people and culture.

Dr. Snipes joined Kaiser Permanente Southern California in 2008 and became a partner physician with SCPMG in 2011, serving as chief of service for the Emergency Department at San Bernardino County Medical Center, where she also served as the physician liaison for disaster planning and triage. Before assuming her current position in January 2019, Dr. Snipes had also served as the assistant area medical director of the Hospital-Based Service Line at the Kaiser Permanente San Bernardino Medical Centers since 2016.

Dr. Snipes received her bachelor’s degree at Oakwood College in Alabama before receiving her medical degree in 1999 from Loma Linda University. She completed her emergency medicine residency at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York in 2003. Prior to her time at Kaiser Permanente, Dr. Snipes was a physician, and later partner physician, at Emergency Physicians of Tidewater in Virginia and also held an associate professorship in the department of Emergency Medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School. She is a member of the American College of Emergency Physicians, the California American College of Emergency Physicians, and the San Bernardino County Medical Society.

In her down time, Dr. Snipes enjoys Sci Fi, reading, and comedy.  Her favorite thing is a day at the beach spent with her favorite people her husband of 19 years and her 2 daughters.  

Lisa R. Roberts, Dr.PH, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CHES, FAANP, FAAN is a Professor and the Research Director at Loma Linda University School of Nursing, with a secondary appointment as Professor in the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies in the School of Behavioral Health to facilitate collaborative translational research.  Her MSN and Family Nurse Practitioner training was obtained at Western University of Health Sciences, and her Dr.PH in health education at the LLU School of Public Health. 

Dr. Roberts' background as a clinician and international experience are foundational to her research.  While she has conducted projects in several other countries, having been raised in India, she has ongoing research in India pertaining to maternal mental health.  Across setting, including in the US, her research is translational, interdisciplinary, and community-based, addressing health disparities and vulnerable populations.

Her clinical focus is prevention and primary care.  She enjoys teaching and mentoring as this provides the opportunity to influence the next generation of nursing researchers and scholars to care for the vulnerable and reduce health disparities.

 

November: What’s Wrong with Saying “All Lives Matter?”

(Download the November Handout)

Bridgette Peteet, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Loma Linda University. Before her appointment last year, she was a faculty member at the University of Cincinnati for 11 years. She is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and currently supervises doctoral trainees at the SACH Health System in San Bernardino. She teaches courses on addiction and cultural diversity.  She runs the Resilience and Disparities (RAD) Lab, which investigates health inequities in substance use disorders/opioid use disorders (SUD/OUD) using a community-inclusive and culturally-responsive framework. She is the PI on a $3 million HRSA Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students grant to build pathways to diversify the scientific workforce. She has facilitated cultural competency training for universities, businesses, and community health agencies for more than 15 years. She is a past recipient of the UC Mariam Spencer Diversity Ambassador Award and the Charles and Shirley Thomas Award from the American Psychological Association Division 45, Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and Race for her institutional and national contributions to diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Lisa Clark Diller, Ph.D. is a historian (University of Chicago) who teaches about the early modern world at Southern Adventist University.  Dr. Clark Diller serves as the History and Political Studies chair at Southern Adventist University, Chattanooga, TN. She researches and writes on religious and ethnic minorities and the development of modern liberal democracy. In addition to seventeenth-century religion and politics, Dr. Clark Diller enjoys neighborhood service and activism with her husband, Tommy Diller. She enjoys being part of three book clubs, one cycling club, and playing with her ten nieces and nephews in her free time.  She and her husband live in an urban community in Chattanooga, TN, where they garden, church plant, and thrive in their neighbors' care.

October: Why Should I Care?: A Lesson on Equity

(Download the October Handout)

Bridgette Peteet, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Loma Linda University. Before her appointment last year, she was a faculty member at the University of Cincinnati for 11 years. She is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and currently supervises doctoral trainees at the SACH Health System in San Bernardino. She teaches courses on addiction and cultural diversity.  She runs the Resilience and Disparities (RAD) Lab, which investigates health inequities in substance use disorders/opioid use disorders (SUD/OUD) using a community-inclusive and culturally-responsive framework. She is the PI on a $3 million HRSA Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students grant to build pathways to diversify the scientific workforce. She has facilitated cultural competency training for universities, businesses, and community health agencies for more than 15 years. She is a past recipient of the UC Mariam Spencer Diversity Ambassador Award and the Charles and Shirley Thomas Award from the American Psychological Association Division 45, Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and Race for her institutional and national contributions to diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Juan Carlos Belliard, Ph.D., MPH, is the Assistant Vice President for Community Partnerships and Director of the Institute for Community Partnerships. He holds an appointment as a Professor in Global Health in the School of Public Health.Juan Carlos Belliard has taught in culture and health; traditional, complementary and alternative medicine; ethnographic research methods; health disparities; and migrant health. His research interests are focused on medical pluralism, exploring how migrant communities utilize parallel healthcare systems. Dr. Belliard is dedicated to various efforts that strengthen community-university relationships. His passion for minority health, education, and health equity have been an impetus in creating the Promotores Academy at the San Manuel Gateway College, a certificate program for promotores/community health workers trained to bridge the gap between health systems and the community. Dr. Belliard and his wife Anastasia have two children Victoria and Nicolás. The Belliards all share a love for music, reading, traveling, camping, running, and fútbol.

Jessica ChenFeng, Ph.D., LMFT, is Associate Director of Physician Vitality at LLUH. Growing up in Los Angeles in a Taiwanese immigrant family and the Asian American Christian church has shaped her research and clinical work around socio-contextual issues such as gender, race, generation, and spirituality. She loves New York in the fall, Seattle in the summer, baking sourdough bread, sewing clothes, and lightly sweetened jasmine milk tea.

Dan Rogstad, MD-PhD, is the Assistant Dean for Basic Science Education at Loma Linda University School of Medicine (LLUSM) and an Infectious Diseases physician in the Department of Medicine at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC).  He has taught Biochemistry to first-year medical students for five years and is a leader in the LLUSM large-scale curriculum transformation that went live in August of 2020.  He has been married to his best friend, Katie, for 17 years and has five children (ages 14 to 5).  He enjoys playing the piano and composing/arranging in his spare time.